Domestic Worldmaking by the Enslaved

Morning Session

(10.00am - 12.00 pm) EST

10.00am - 10:30am  Domestic Worldmaking Project Introduction by Mae-ling Lokko

10.30am - 10.55am  Session 1:  Making a Life On and Off the Water (Recording)

                                  Geographical Connections: West Africa, Caribbean, Brazil

                                  Speakers and Discussants: 

                                  Prof. Kevin Dawson (Univ.of California Merced), Simon Benjamin (Hunter)

10.55am - 11.15am  Session 1 Discussion

11.15am - 11.40am  Session 2: Green Architecture: Gardens and Provision Grounds 

                                  (Recording)

                                  Geographical Connections:  Brazil and Caribbean

                                  Speakers and Discussants: 

                                  Geri Augusto (Brown University), 

                                  Elionice (Leo) Sacramento, (Quilombo Conceição das Salinas, Bahia)

11.40am - 12.00pm  Session 2 Discussion

12.00pm - 01.00pm  Lunch Break 

Afternoon Session

(1.00 pm - 3.45 pm) EST

01.00pm - 01.25pm  Session 3: Remaking A Home (Recording)

                                  Geographical Connections: Brazil, West Africa

                                  Speakers and Discussants: 

                                  Mae-ling Lokko (Yale University)

                                  Henry Wellington (Univ.of Ghana, Retired)

01.25pm - 01.45pm Session 3 Discussion

01.45pm -02.10pm  Session 4: Monumental Lives (Recording)

                                  Speakers and Discussants:

                                  Geographical Connections: Caribbean, Nordic Region

                                  Marie Louise Richards, (Royal Institute of Art, Stockholm) 

                                  La Vaughn Belle, (University of the Virgin Islands)

                                  Michael Barrett (Museum of Ethnography Stockholm)

                                  Jonelle Twum  (Founder, Black Archives Sweden)

02.10pm - 02.30pm  Session 4 Discussion

02.30pm - 02.45pm  15 min Coffee Break

02.45pm - 03.45pm   Closing Discussion and Remarks

Supported by a Global Connection grant from MIT’s Global Architectural History and Teaching Collaborative, the closed virtual symposium on February 19, 2022 kicks-off of the longer-term project "Domestic Worldmaking by the Enslaved". The ambition for the symposium is to stimulate a collective story-telling typologies and integration of diverse work related to the agency and innovations within the domestic practices of individuals enslaved during the Transatlantic Slave Trade.  From their materials and building traditions, their gardens to their culinary inventions, we aim to bring to life for new audiences, and in new ways, the still underexplored material ecology that the enslaved continuously innovated to rebuild their lives in new environments.

Global Connections

Symposium

February 19, 2022

Afternoon Session

(1.00 pm - 3.45 pm) EST

01.00pm - 01.25pm  Session 3: Remaking A Home

                                  Geographical Connections: Brazil, West Africa

                                  Speakers and Discussants: 

                                  Mae-ling Lokko (Yale University)

                                  Henry Wellington (Univ.of Ghana, Retired)

01.25pm - 01.45pm Session 3 Discussion

01.45pm -02.10pm  Session 4: Monumental Lives

                                  Speakers and Discussants:

                                  Geographical Connections: Caribbean, Nordic Region

                                  Marie Louise Richards, (Royal Institute of Art, Stockholm) 

                                  La Vaughn Belle, (University of the Virgin Islands)

                                  Michael Barrett (Museum of Ethnography Stockholm)

                                  Jonelle Twum  (Founder, Black Archives Sweden)

02.10pm - 02.30pm  Session 4 Discussion

02.30pm - 02.45pm  15 min Coffee Break

02.45pm - 03.45pm   Closing Discussion and Remarks

This project was made possible by the support of 

Domestic Worldmaking by the Enslaved